More Health Careers

Health care is a vast field that offers a range of diverse opportunities to help improve people’s health and well being. The Bureau of Labor Statistics expects health care to be the fastest growing employment industry between 2014 and 2024. This means more career possibilties for individuals who are passionate about caring for and helping others.

Click on the tabs below to explore more careers in the health professions.


Anesthesiologist Assistant

Anesthesiologist Assistants (AA) are highly skilled professionals qualified by advanced academic and clinical education to provide anesthetic care under the direction of a licensed anesthesiologists (specialist physicians) and as part of anesthesia care team to design and implement anesthesia care plans. AAs accompany the patient before, during and after anesthesia to ensure quality and continuity of care. AAs gather patient data, assist in the evaluation of patients’ physical and mental statuses, record the surgical procedures planned, and help the directing anesthesiologist administer the therapeutic plan. Anesthesiologist Assistants are trained to assist in life-saving measures, such as CPR, and advanced cardiac life support.


Anesthesiologist Assistants typically do the following:

  • Take complete health history of patients

  • Perform physical exams to identify any issues that may affect the anesthesia care plan

  • Administer diagnostic and laboratory tests

  • Prepare the patient to be monitored, using noninvasive and invasive methods, as determined by the physician

  • Assist with preparatory procedures, such as pulmonary artery catheterization, electroencephalographic spectral analysis, echocardiography and evoked potentials

  • Pre-test and calibrate anesthesia delivery systems and monitors

  • Induce, sustain and adjust anesthesia levels

  • Ensure continuity of care through the postoperative recovery period

  • Assist with life support where required, including airway management

  • Perform functions in the intensive care unit and pain clinic

  • Perform administrative duties, research and clinical instruction


Learn more about AA: 


Application Process:

  • Degree RequiredTo become an AA, you must complete a 2-year master’s program in anesthesia. Look for a program that is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs
  • Application Timeline:  The application opens in June of the year preceding planned matriculation. Applicants should plan to apply early in the cycle. 
  • Recommendation Letters: CASAA will accept up to 3 reference letters. It is recommended that at least 1 be from a science faculty member. See the CASAA FAQ for more info.
  • Interviews: Almost all AA programs require an interview as part of the application process.
Visit the "Apply" section of the PHMO website to learn additional details and tips about the application process for health professional programs.

Required Coursework:

Qualified student applicants must complete all of the premedical coursework required by the typical American medical school. The chart below is a list of common AA program requirements and the Emory course equivalents. Requirements vary by school. This list does not include all courses that may be required by AA programs. Additionally, schools have differing policies for accepting AP/IB credits to fulfill prerequisites.  Students are responsible for verifying the prerequisite coursework and AP/IB policies of the schools to which they plan to apply.

Area of Study
(Discipline or Department)

Emory Course Equivalents

Biology
(2 semesters)

 BIOL 141 with lab and BIOL 142 with lab

Chemistry
(General and Organic - 2 semesters)

 If you started Chemistry courses at Emory prior to Fall 2017: Chem 141, 142, 221, and 222 all with labs

 If you started Chemistry courses at Emory Fall 2017 or later: Chem 150, 202, 203, and 204 all with labs

Biochemistry
(1 semester)

 BIOL 301 or CHEM 301

Physics
(2 semesters)

 PHYS 141 with lab and PHYS 142 with lab      or

 PHYS 151 with lab and PHYS 152 with lab

Human Anatomy and Physiology*
(2 semesters)

 NRSG 201 and 202 with labs (must receive permission from Nursing School)

Statistics
(1 semester)

 QTM 100 or ECON 220

Calculus
(1 semester)

 MATH 111

English
(1 semester)

 ENG 101, ENG 181, CPLT 110, or CWRT courses in the English langauge

This is not an all-inclusive list! Make sure to check with the individual programs to confirm their requirements.

*Not offered at Emory College. You can request to take this sequence in the Nursing School or apply to take it at another local university via the ARCHE Cross Registration program.

 Please contact your pre-health advisor if:

  • You have questions about using your AP/IB credit
  • You began Chemistry coursework at Emory prior to Fall 2017 and have questions about how to proceed
  • You transferred to Emory and have questions about prerequisite coursework taken at your previous institution.
  • You have questions about taking a course through the ARCHE program.

Source: Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs <http://www.caahep.org/Content.aspx?ID=20> 

Source: Explore Health Careers <https://explorehealthcareers.org/career/allied-health-professions/anesthesiologist-assistant>

Audiology

Audiologists identify hearing and balance disorders, provide rehabilitative services, assess amplification devices and instruct patients in their care. A Doctor of Audiology (AuD) is an independent professional who specializes in diagnosing, managing, and treating hearing- and balance-related disorders. Audiology is closely connected to the field of speech-language pathology (SLP). Some audiologists also become certified speech-language pathologists, but each profession is a distinct career in its own right.


Audiologists typically do the following:

  • Diagnose and treat hearing problems, including balance function and disorders.

  • Treat most hearing impairments through modern hearing technology, including programmable and digital hearing aids and other hearing assistive technology systems.

  • Program cochlear implants and serve on multidisciplinary cochlear implant teams.

  • Develop and implement prevention, screening and early detection programs.

  • Provide treatment services to enable individuals to communicate effectively.

  • Fit and dispense hearing aids

  • Counsel patients and their families on ways to listen and communicate, such as by lip reading or through technology

  • Evaluate patients regularly to check on hearing and balance and to continue or change the treatment plan

  • Research the causes and treatment of hearing and balance disordersEducate patients on ways to prevent hearing loss


Audiologists typically work in the following settings:

  • Hosptials

  • Residental  and long-term care facilties

  • Outpatient clinics

  • Private and group practice

  • Schools

  • Government agencies

  • Health and personal care stores

Important Qualities:

  • Communication skills: Audiologists need to communicate test results, diagnoses, and proposed treatments, so patients clearly understand the situation and options. They also may need to work on teams with other healthcare providers and education specialists regarding patient care.

  • Compassion: Audiologists work with patients who may be frustrated or emotional because of their hearing or balance problems. Audiologists should be empathetic and supportive of patients and their families.

  • Critical-thinking skills: Audiologists must concentrate when testing a patient’s hearing and be able to analyze each patient’s situation, to offer the best treatment. They must also be able to provide alternative plans when patients do not respond to initial treatment. 

  • Patience: Audiologists must work with patients who may need a lot of time and special attention.

  • Problem-solving skills: Audiologists must figure out the causes of problems with hearing and balance and determine the appropriate treatment or treatments to address them.


Learn more about Audiology:


Application Process:

  • Degree Required: Three to four-year doctoral degree in Audiology (Au.D.). Look for programs accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation.
  • Entrance Exam: Au.D. programs require the GRE.
  • Centralized Application Service:  Communication Sciences and Disorders Centralized Application Service (CSDCAS); Not all Au.D. programs participate in CSDCAS. Check with each individual school to determine how to apply.
  • Application Timeline:  The CSDCAS application cycle opens in August of the year preceding planned matriculation. Applicants should plan to apply early in the cycle.
  • Recommendation Letters: Most programs require a minimum of 3 letters. CSDCAS will accept a minimum of 3 letters of reference and a maximum of 5.
  • Interviews: Almost all Au.D. programs require an interview as part of the application process. See the American Academy of Audiology Interview Tips.

Visit the "Apply" section of the PHMO website to learn additional details and get tips about the application process for health professional programs.


Required Coursework:

The chart below is a list of common Au.D. program requirements and the Emory course equivalents. Requirements vary widely by school. This list does not include all courses that may be required by Au.D. programs. Additionally, schools have differing policies for accepting AP/IB credits to fulfill prerequisites.  Students are responsible for verifying the prerequisite coursework and AP/IB policies of the schools to which they plan to apply. Explore audiology programs to review the specific requirements for individual schools.

Area of Study
(Discipline or Department)

Emory Course Equivalents

Biology
(1-2 semesters)

 BIOL 141 with lab and BIOL 142 with lab

Physical Science
(Chemistry and Physics, 2 semesters)

 CHEM 150 and PHYS 141 - CHEM 202 and PHYS 142 are also recommended.

Anatomy/Human Physiology
(1-2 semesters)

 BIOL 205 and/or BIOL 336

Statistics
(1 semester)

 QTM 100 or ECON 220

Linguistics
(2 semesters)

Many couses in the LING department may fulfill this requirement, including, but not limited to:

LING 201, LING 210, LING 212, LING 309, and LING 314

Behavioral Science
(2 semesters)

 Many couses in the NBB, PSYC, and SOC departments may fulfill this requirement.

This is not an all-inclusive list! Make sure to check with the individual programs to confirm their requirements.

*Au.D. programs may require additional courses that are not offered at Emory College. In this case, you may apply to take courses at another local university through the ARCHE Cross Registration program.

 Please contact your pre-health advisor if:

  • You have questions about using your AP/IB credit
  • You transferred to Emory and have questions about prerequisite coursework taken at your previous institution.
  • You have questions about taking a course through the ARCHE program.


Source: http://explorehealthcareers.org/en/Career/58/Audiologist_Doctor_of_Audiology

Source: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/audiologists.htm

Chiropractic Medicine

Chiropractic Medicine evaluates patients’ overall health by exploring the relationship between the body’s structure and function. Doctors of Chiropractic (DC) or Chiropractors take a holistic approach to health care. Chiropractors diagnose and treat patients whose health problems are associated with the body’s muscular, nervous, and skeletal systems. They treat the musculoskeletal system which includes bones, muscles, nerves, ligaments and tendons, and often focus on the spinal column.  While Chiropractors do not prescribe medications nor perform surgery, they often work with patients’ other health care providers or refer to health care practitioners who can do both. Some chiropractors concentrate in areas such as sports, neurology, orthopedics, pediatrics, or nutrition, among others.


Chiropractors typically do the following:

  • Assess a patient's medical condition by reviewing medical history, listening to concerns, and performing a physical examination.

  • Analyze the patient’s posture, spine, and reflexes

  • Conduct additional diagnostic tests, including evaluating a patient's posture or taking x rays

  • Provide neuromusculoskeletal therapy, which involves adjusting a patient’s spinal column and other joints by hand

  • Provide additional treatments, such as applying heat or cold to a patient's injured areas

  • Advise patients on health and lifestyle issues, such as exercise and sleep habits

  • Refer patients to other medical specialists if needed


Important Qualities:

  • Decision-making skills: Chiropractors must determine the best course of action when treating a patient. They must also decide when to refer patients to other healthcare professionals.

  • Detail-oriented: Chiropractors must be observant and pay attention to details so that they can make proper diagnoses and avoid mistakes that could harm patients.

  • Dexterity: Because they use their hands to perform manual adjustments to the spine and other joints, chiropractors should have good coordination to perform therapy effectively.

  • Empathy: Chiropractors often care for people who are in pain. They must be understanding and sympathetic to their patients’ problems and needs.  

  • Interpersonal skills. Chiropractors must be personable in order to keep clients coming to their practice. Also, because chiropractors frequently touch patients in performing therapy, they should be able to put their patients at ease.


Learn more about Chiropractic Medicine:


Application Process:

  • Degree Required: Four-year Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) degree. Look for a program accredited by the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE).

  • Entrance Exam: Most programs do not require an entrance exam
  • Centralized Application Service: ChiroCAS; Not all programs participate. Check with each individual school to determine how to apply.
  • Application Timeline:  Applicants should plan to apply 9-12 months before they plan to matriculate.
  • Recommendation Letters: Most programs require 2-3. ChiroCAS will accept a maximum of 3 letters of reference.
  • Interviews: Several DC programs require an interview as part of the application process.

Visit the "Apply" section of the PHMO website to learn additional details and get tips about the application process for health professional programs.


Required Coursework:

The chart below is a list of common D.C. program requirements and the Emory course equivalents. Requirements vary widely by school. This list does not include all courses that may be required by D.C programs. Additionally, schools have differing policies for accepting AP/IB credits to fulfill prerequisites.  Students are responsible for verifying the prerequisite coursework and AP/IB policies of the schools to which they plan to apply. Explore chiropractic programs to review the specific requirements for individual schools. D.C. programs require a minimum of 24 credit hours in the life and physical sciences.

Area of Study
(Discipline or Department)

Emory Course Equivalents

Biology
(2 semesters)

 BIOL 141 with lab and BIOL 142 with lab

Chemistry
(2-4 semesters)

 If you started Chemistry courses at Emory prior to Fall 2017: Chem 141, 142, 221, and 222 all with labs

 If you started Chemistry courses at Emory Fall 2017 or later: Chem 150, 202, 203, and 204 all with labs

Physics
(1-2 semesters)

 PHYS 141 with lab and PHYS 142 with lab      or

 PHYS 151 with lab and PHYS 152 with lab

Human Anatomy and Physiology*
(1-2 semesters)

 NRSG 201 and 202 with labs (must receive permission from Nursing School)

 BIOL 205 and BIOL 336 in the College may satisy this requirement

Social Science
(1-2 semesters)

 Many couses in the ANT, PSYC, and SOC departments may satisfy this requirement.

College Math
(1 semester)

 MATH 111 or QTM 100

English
(1-2 semesters)

 ENG 101, ENG 181, CPLT 110, or CWRT courses in the English langauge

This is not an all-inclusive list! Make sure to check with the individual programs to confirm their requirements.

*The traditional Human Anatomy and Physiology with lab sequence is not offered at Emory College. You can request to take this sequence in the Nursing School or apply to take it at another local university via the ARCHE Cross Registration program. DC programs may accept BIOL 205 (Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy) and BIOL 336 (Human Physiology) in the College.

 Please contact your pre-health advisor if:

  • You have questions about using your AP/IB credit
  • You began Chemistry coursework at Emory prior to Fall 2017 and have questions about how to proceed
  • You transferred to Emory and have questions about prerequisite coursework taken at your previous institution.
  • You have questions about taking a course through the ARCHE program.

Source: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/chiropractors.htm#tab-2

Source: https://explorehealthcareers.org/career/chiropractic-medicine/chiropractor/

Health Administration

Health administrators manage a healthcare business (hospital networks, specialty clinics, treatment centers, physician practices, nursing homes, health agencies, pharmaceutical companies, insurance providers, medical supply/equipment companies, government departments, etc.) and keep it operationally sound. The profession includes people who plan, direct, coordinate, and supervise the delivery of healthcare – from middle managers to CEOs at organizations that range from sole proprietorships to major international companies. Healthcare administrators are leaders in business.


Health Administrators typically do the following:

  • Work to improve efficiency and quality in delivering healthcare services
  • Develop departmental goals and objectives
  • Ensure that the facility in which they work is up to date on and compliant with new laws and regulations
  • Recruit, train, and supervise staff
  • Manage the finances of the facility, such as patient fees and billing
  • Create work schedules
  • Prepare and monitor budgets and spending to ensure departments operate within allocated funds
  • Represent the facility at investor meetings or on governing boards
  • Keep and organize records of the facility’s services, such as the number of inpatient beds used
  • Communicate with members of the medical staff and department heads

Important Qualities:

  • Analytical skills: Medical and health services managers must understand and follow current regulations and adapt to new laws.

  • Communication skills: These managers must effectively communicate policies and procedures with other health professionals and ensure their staff’s compliance with new laws and regulations.

  • Detail oriented: Medical and health services managers must pay attention to detail. They might be required to organize and maintain scheduling and billing information for very large facilities, such as hospitals.

  • Interpersonal skills: Medical and health services managers discuss staffing problems and patient information with other professionals, such as physicians and health insurance representatives.

  • Leadership skills: These managers are often responsible for finding creative solutions to staffing or other administrative problems. They must hire, train, motivate, and lead staff.

  • Technical skills: Medical and health services managers must stay up to date with advances in healthcare technology and data analytics. For example, they may need to use coding and classification software and electronic health record (EHR) systems as their facility adopts these technologies.


Learn more about Health Administration:


Application Process:

  • Degree Required: Many degrees will allow students to work in the field of Health Administration, including a master’s degree in health administration, health management, or public health. Degrees in business with course concentration in health services management or joint degrees–a master’s degree in both business administration and public health, for example, are also appropriate paths to working in this field.  Look for a program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education.
  • Entrance Exam:Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Check with individual schools before applying. While some schools have a distinct preference, many schools will accept either examination.
  • Centralized Application Service:Healthcare Administration, Management & Policy Application Service (HAMPCAS). Not all programs participate in HAMPCAS. Check with each individual school to determine how to apply. Check with the program you are interested in to determine which term would be best for you to apply:  Winter, Interim, Spring, Summer, or Fall.
  • Application Timeline:  The HAMPCAS application opens in September of the year preceding planned matriculation. Different schools may accept students into health administration programs at different points throughout the year.
  • Recommendation Letters: The standard requirement by many health administration schools is to require you to have at least 3 letters of recommendation. Please be aware that schools may not appreciate receiving more application materials than required. It is in the best interest of all applicants to check the admissions criteria of each school before choosing your letter writers.  You will want to carefully choose people who can confidently write about your demonstration of any/all of the following qualities: academic achievement, healthcare work experience, communication skills, general leadership skills, business skills, quantitative skills, and personal character.
  • Interviews: Many programs require an interview as part of the application process.

Visit the "Apply" section of the PHMO website to learn additional details and get tips about the application process for health professional programs.


Required Coursework:

  • Degrees in health management/administration are available at the baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral levels.
  • A 4-year baccalaureate degree, typically with a minimum 3.0 GPA, is the primary prerequisite for admission to a graduate program.
  • Your undergraduate degree can be obtained in any field of study ranging from healthcare management and business, to biology, or even unrelated fields with extensive healthcare shadowing/service.
  • Some coursework in economics and statistics is helpful, but not generally a requirement. 


Source: https://explorehealthcareers.org/career/health-administration-management/health-administrator/ 

Source: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/Management/Medical-and-health-services-managers.htm#tab-4

Mental Health

There are many different professionals who work with a diverse set of patients or clients dealing with mental health issues. Some of the most common mental health practitioners are Psychiatrists (M.D. who diagnose and treat mental illnesses), Psychologists (Ph.D. who treat mental and emotional problems), Mental Health/Marriage and Family Therapists (LPC or LMFT who treat mental and emotional disorders that revolve around life experiences and changes), and Social Workers (MSW who asses client needs and help make plans/referrals for support when faced with crisis situations). 

Mental health professionals can work with general or specific populations, as well as with people across the lifespan and who experience different types of distress.  Mental health professionals can assist with diagnosis, and a variety of treatments or referrals relating to a wide range of personal/family stressors as well as emotional and behavioral issues.  Each specific profession may be grounded in different theories and there may be limits to diagnoses and treatments based on degree, training and state licensing regulations.  


 Mental Health Practitioners typically do the following:

  • Collect information about client’s life and experiences.
  • Diagnose and treat mental, emotional and behavioral disorders.
  • Encourage clients to discuss explore emotions and experiences, and better understand their own emotions, behaviors and relationships.
  • Help patients’ process life occurrences and changes.
  • Help patients develop coping/behavioral strategies.
  • Coordinate and refer clients to other health professionals and resources.

Important Qualities:

  • Compassion: Counselors and therapists often work with people who are dealing with stressful and difficult situations, so they must be compassionate and empathize with their clients.
  • Interpersonal skills: Being able to work with different types of people is essential for counselors and therapists. They spend most of their time working directly with clients and other professionals and must be able to encourage good relationships.
  • Listening skills: Good listening skills are essential for mental health counselors and marriage and family therapists, both of whom need to give their full attention to their clients to understand their problems, values, and goals.
  • Organizational skills: Good organizational skills are especially important for counselors and therapists in private practice, who must keep track of payments and work with insurance companies.
  • Speaking skills: Mental health counselors and marriage and family therapists need to be able to communicate with clients effectively. They must express ideas and information in a way that clients can understand easily.

 Learn more about Mental Health:


Application Process:

  • Degree Required: The degree required will vary based on the profession. Clinical Psychologists will be required to obtain a Psy.D. or PhD, while mental health counselors will need to obtain a master's degree. While there is a bachelor's degree in Social Work, most positions require a master's.

  • Admissions Exam: Students applying to Psy.D., Ph.D. or master’s level programs will most likely take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Check with specific schools about admission exam requirements.Application ServicePSYCAS (Psychology) and SocialWorkCAS (Social Work). Not all programs participate in PSYCAS or SocialWorkCAS. Check the CSWE Directory of Accredited Programs to determine which Social Work programs utilize the centralized application and the APA to determine which Psychology programs utilize the centralized application. There is no centralized application service for counseling programs.

  • Application ServicePSYCAS (Psychology) and SocialWorkCAS (Social Work). Not all programs participate in PSYCAS or SocialWorkCAS. Check the CSWE Directory of Accredited Programs to determine which Social Work programs utilize the centralized application and the APA to determine which Psychology programs utilize the centralized application. There is no centralized application service for counseling programs.

  • Application timeline: Each school may have unique entry dates.  Refer to the school’s application timeline to apply for the appropriate cycle. Most students will apply in the Fall of the year preceding planned matriculation.

  • Letters of Recommendation: Each school will have different requirements, but students should be prepared with a minimum of two letters of recommendation.

  • Interviews: Most psychology, mental health, and social work programs require an interview as part of the application process.

Visit the "Apply" section of the PHMO website to learn additional details and get tips about the application process for health professional programs.


Source: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/mental-health-counselors-and-marriage-and-family-therapists.htm

Naturopathic Medicine

Naturopathic medicine is a distinct primary health care profession that combines the wisdom of nature with the rigors of modern science. Naturopathic physicians are trained as primary care providers who diagnose, treat and manage patients with acute and chronic conditions, while addressing disease and dysfunction at the level of body, mind and spirit. They concentrate on whole-patient wellness through health promotion and disease prevention, attempting to find the underlying cause of the patient’s condition. They provide individualized, evidence-informed therapies that balance the least harmful and most effective approaches to help facilitate the body’s inherent ability to restore and maintain optimal health.

Principles of Naturopathic Medicine:

  • Do no harm: Utilize the most natural, least invasive and least toxic therapies.
  • The healing power of nature: Trust in the body’s inherent wisdom to heal itself.
  • Identify and treat the causes: Look beyond the symptoms to the underlying cause.
  • Physician as teacher: Educate patients in the steps to achieving and maintaining health.
  • Treat the whole person: View the body as an integrated whole in all its physical and spiritual dimensions.
  • Prevention: Focus on overall health, wellness and disease prevention.

Important Qualities:

  • Academically successful and grounded in the sciences

  • Prefer a holistic approach to patient care

  • Recognize the role of nutrition and lifestyle in health care

  • Have a background in volunteerism

  • Good communicators with a pleasant bedside manner

  • Inquisitive, like to get to the root of the problem

  • Measure personal success in terms of impact, not status

  • Respectful of the environment

  • Socially concerned

  • Understand the art and the science of medicine


Learn more about Naturopathic Medicine:


Application Process:

  • Application Timeline:  The NDCAS application opens late August of the year preceding planned matriculation. Applicants should plan to apply early in the cycle. 

  • Recommendation Letters: NDCAS requires a minimum of 3 reference letters and will accept up to 5. It is recommended that at least 1 be from a science faculty member. Check with each individual school to determine their requirements.

  • Interviews: Naturopathic medical programs require an interview as part of the application process.

Visit the "Apply" section of the PHMO website to learn additional details and tips about the application process for health professional programs.


Required Coursework:

Qualified student applicants must complete all of the premedical coursework required by the typical American medical school. The chart below is a list of common program requirements and the Emory course equivalents. Requirements vary by school. This list does not include all courses that may be required by Naturopathic Medical programs. Additionally, schools have differing policies for accepting AP/IB credits to fulfill prerequisites.  Students are responsible for verifying the prerequisite coursework and AP/IB policies of the schools to which they plan to apply.

Area of Study
(Discipline or Department)

Emory Course Equivalents

Biology
(2 semesters)

 BIOL 141 with lab and BIOL 142 with lab

Chemistry
(General and Organic - 2 semesters)

 If you started Chemistry courses at Emory prior to Fall 2017: Chem 141, 142, 221, and 222 all with labs

 If you started Chemistry courses at Emory Fall 2017 or later: Chem 150, 202, 203, and 204 all with labs

Biochemistry
(1 semester)

 BIOL 301 or CHEM 301

Physics
(1-2 semesters)

 PHYS 141 with lab and PHYS 142 with lab      or

 PHYS 151 with lab and PHYS 152 with lab

Human Physiology
(1 semester)

 BIOL 336

Statistics
(1 semester)

 QTM 100 or ECON 220

Psychology
(1-2 semesters)

 Any Psychology course will fulfill this requirement

English
(1-2 semesters)

 ENG 101, ENG 181, CPLT 110, or CWRT courses in the English langauge

This is not an all-inclusive list! Make sure to check with the individual programs to confirm their requirements.

 Please contact your pre-health advisor if:

  • You have questions about using your AP/IB credit
  • You began Chemistry coursework at Emory prior to Fall 2017 and have questions about how to proceed
  • You transferred to Emory and have questions about prerequisite coursework taken at your previous institution.

Source: https://explorehealthcareers.org/field/naturopathic-medicine/

Nutrition and Dietetics

Dietetics is the science of how food and nutrition affects human health. The field of dietetics has a strong emphasis on public health and a commitment to educating all Americans about the importance of making proper dietary choices. Registered Dietitian Nutritionists are the experts in the use of food and nutrition to promote health and manage disease.

There are several specialities within Dietetics and Nutrition, including Community Dietitians and Clinical Dietitians.  Community dietitians develop programs and counsel the public on topics related to food, health, and nutrition. Clinical dietitians provide medical nutrition therapy for patients in institutions such as hospitals and nursing care facilities. They assess patients' nutritional needs, develop and implement nutrition programs, and evaluate and report the results. They confer with doctors and other healthcare professionals in order to coordinate medical and dietary needs.


Dieticians typically do the following:

  • Explain nutrition issues

  • Assess patients’ and clients’ nutritional and health needs

  • Counsel patients on nutrition issues and healthy eating habits

  • Develop meal plans, taking both cost and clients’ preferences into account

  • Evaluate the effects of meal plans and change the plans as needed

  • Promote better health by speaking to groups about diet, nutrition, and the relationship between good eating habits and preventing or managing specific diseases

  • Keep up with or contribute to the latest food and nutritional science research

  • Write reports to document patients’ progress

Dieticians typically work in the following settings:

  • Hospitals

  • Government and nonprofit agencies

  • Schools

  • Health Maintenance Organizations

  • Nursing home and residential facilities

  • Outpatient care centers

  • Private practice

Important Qualities:

  • Analytical skill:. Dietitians and nutritionists must keep up to date with the latest food and nutrition research. They should be able to interpret scientific studies and translate nutrition science into practical eating advice.

  • Compassion: Dietitians and nutritionists must be caring and empathetic when helping clients address health and dietary issues and any related emotions.

  • Listening skills: Dietitians and nutritionists must listen carefully to understand clients’ goals and concerns. They may work with other healthcare workers as part of a team to improve the health of a patient, and they need to listen to team members when constructing eating plans.

  • Organizational skills: Because there are many aspects to the work of dietitians and nutritionists, they should be able to stay organized. Management dietitians, for example, must consider the nutritional needs of their clients, the costs of meals, and access to food.

  • Problem-solving skills: Dietitians and nutritionists must evaluate the health status of patients and determine the most appropriate food choices for a client to improve his or her overall health or manage a disease.

  • Speaking skills: Dietitians and nutritionists must explain complicated topics in a way that people with less technical knowledge can understand. They must be able to clearly explain eating plans to clients and to other healthcare professionals involved in a patient’s care.


Learn More about Dietetics and Nutrition:


Required Coursework:

There is no universal list of prerequisites courses for all nutrtition and dietetics programs. Course requirements will vary based the type of program and degree you are pursing. Below you will find a list of common course requirements for dietetics programs. This is not an all-inclusive list! Make sure to check with the individual programs to confirm their requirements.

Area of Study
(Discipline or Department)

Emory Course Equivalents

Biology

 BIOL 141 with lab and BIOL 142 with lab

Chemistry
(General and Organic)

 If you started Chemistry courses at Emory prior to Fall 2017: Chem 141, 142, and 221 all with labs

 If you started Chemistry courses at Emory Fall 2017 or later: Chem 150, 202, 203, and 204 all with labs

Human Anatomy and Physiology* 

 NRSG 201 with lab and 202 with lab (must receive permission from Nursing School)

Nutrition

 HTLH 220 and/or 221

Microbiology

 BIOL 370 with lab (BIOL 141 and 142 with labs are

Psychology/Sociology

 Psyc 110 or PSYC 111    and/or      SOC 101 or SOC 230    (most all PSYC or SOC courses will work)

*This course sequence is not offered at Emory College. You may request to take this sequence in the School of Nursing or apply to take it a local university through the ARCHE program.

 Please contact your pre-health advisor if:

  • You have questions about using your AP/IB credit
  • You began Chemistry coursework at Emory prior to Fall 2017 and have questions about how to proceed
  • You transferred to Emory and have questions about prerequisite coursework taken at your previous institution.
  • You have questions about taking a course through the ARCHE program.

 


Source: https://explorehealthcareers.org/career/nutrition-dietetics/dietitian-nutritionist/

Source: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dietitians-and-nutritionists.htm

Occupational Thearpy

Occupational therapy provides treatments based on everyday activities to patients who have suffered injuries and/or illnesses, or have disabilities. The goal of occupational therapy is to promote health by teaching physical and/or cognitive skills to patients so they can live productive lives with their injury, illness or disability. Occupational therapists work in a variety of settings and with a wide range of populations.  They can also specialize by working with specific ages or particular injuries/disabilities.


Occupational Therapists typically do the following:

  • Observe patients doing tasks and review medical history.

  • Use observations and history to evaluate condition and needs.

  • Create a treatment plan that includes activities and goals.

  • Demonstrate movements/activities that can help improve daily or work activities.

  • Evaluate home/workplace and make recommendations that will support health needs.


Important Qualities:

Communication skills: Occupational therapists must be able to listen attentively to what patients tell them and must be able to explain what they want their patients to do.

Compassion: Occupational therapists are usually drawn to the profession by a desire to help people and improve their daily lives. Therapists must be sensitive to a patients’ needs and concerns, especially when assisting the patient with his or her personal activities.

Flexibility: Occupational therapists must be flexible when treating patients. Because not every type of therapy will work for each patient, therapists may need to be creative when determining the treatment plans and adaptive devices that best suit each patient’s needs.

Interpersonal skills: Because occupational therapists spend their time teaching and explaining therapies to patients, they should be able to earn the trust and respect of those patients and their families.

Patience: Dealing with injuries, illnesses, and disabilities is frustrating for many people. Occupational therapists should be patient in order to provide quality care to the people they serve.

Writing skills: When communicating in writing with other members of the patient’s medical team, occupational therapists must be able to explain clearly the treatment plan for the patient and any progress made by the patient.


Learn more about Occupational Therapy: 



Application Process:

  • Degree RequiredTo become an OT, you must complete a master’s program in occupational therapy. Look for a program that is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education.

  • Entrance Exam: Most OT programs require the GRE, however not all programs require an entrance exam.

  • Centralized Application Service: Occupational Therapist Centralized Application Service (OTCAS); Not all programs participate in OTCAS. To view a list of participating programs, click here.

  • Application Timeline:  The application opens in July of the year preceding planned matriculation. Applicants should plan to apply early in the cycle. 

  • Recommendation Letters: OTCAS requires 3 reference letters and will accept up to 5. Check with each school to which you plan to apply to determine their reference letter requirements. See the OTCAS FAQ for more info.

  • Interviews: Almost all OT programs require an interview as part of the application process.

Visit the "Apply" section of the PHMO website to learn additional details and tips about the application process for health professional programs.


Required Coursework:

The chart below is a list of common OT program requirements and the Emory course equivalents. Requirements vary widely by school. This list does not include all courses that may be required by OT programs. Additionally, schools have differing policies for accepting AP/IB credits to fulfill prerequisites.  Students are responsible for verifying the prerequisite coursework and AP/IB policies of the schools to which they plan to apply. Explore OT programs to review the specific requirements for individual schools.

Area of Study
(Discipline or Department)

Emory Course Equivalents

Biology
(2 semesters)

 BIOL 141 and BIOL 142 with labs

Chemistry
(1-2 semeters)

 CHEM 150 and CHEM 202 with labs

Physics
(2 semesters)

 PHYS 141 and PHYS 142 with labs      or

 PHYS 151 and PHYS 152 with labs

Human Anatomy and Physiology*
(2 semesters)

 NRSG 201 and NRSG 202 with labs (must receive permission from Nursing School)

Human Growth and Development*(1 semester)

 NRSG 200 (must receive permission from Nursing School)
 *A combination of courses in the PSYC department may fulfill this requirement.

Statistics
(1 semester)

 QTM 100 or ECON 220

Psychology
(2 semesters)

 PSYC 111 or 110 and PSYC 210

Social/Behavioral Sciences
(1-2 semesters)

 Any SOC or ANT course should fulfill this requirement

English
(1-2 semesters)

 ENG 101, ENG 181, CPLT 110, or CWRT courses in the English langauge

This is not an all-inclusive list! Make sure to check with the individual programs to confirm their requirements.

*Not offered at Emory College. You can request to take this sequence in the Nursing School or apply to take it at another local university via the ARCHE Cross Registration program.

 Please contact your pre-health advisor if:

  • You have questions about using your AP/IB credit

  • You transferred to Emory and have questions about prerequisite coursework taken at your previous institution

  • You have questions about taking a course through the ARCHE program.


Source: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/occupational-therapists.htm#tab-1